July 24, 2014

Louisville DJ Makes All the Right Social Moves

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By Milo Burke
Louisville, Ky.—Eric Woodland received the best training a DJ could ever receive: slogging away for a multi-op business, a tutorial behind the console.

“It was a great way to learn what not to do,” says Woodland, now the owner of DJ Woody Events and Entertainment.

“A lot of my experience [with the multi-op] was quantity over quality,” he says. “I realized the things that multi-ops weren’t able to provide. A lot of what I was doing was, ‘Here’s a wedding—go do it. We’ll have some equipment for you—hopefully, it’s all working—and the clients will have no idea who you are.’

“I could see the frustration in peoples’ eyes. You show up, they don’t know you, and you say, ‘I’m your DJ. I’ve never met you. I hope you like my personality. I hope I’m able to read your crowd and perform the way you want—and I hope that you’ll trust me.’”

Now, as an owner, Woodland does one event per day. “Now I do one wedding a day, and the client will meet with me, and they know they’ll be getting me. I’ll walk through the venue with them, act everything out, write out their agenda and their timeline and execute it exactly as we talked about.”

Actually, Woodland will do a minimum of three meetings with brides prior to an event. “The three meetings are mandatory,” he says. “At first, it’ll be the when and where and who and what, and we don’t talk pricing. We talk about what they’ve seen and what they liked, a couple months out, we’ll sit down and take their requests, log their timeline in DJ Intelligence, and we’ll incorporate those into their big day.”

One thing that Woodland likes to do differently is to steer clients away from tried-and-true songs. “No offense to anyone who likes Frank Sinatra or Boyz II Men, but those songs have been used. So I try and dig deeper and find something that will stick out in people’s minds when they remember your wedding. It’s all about creating or accessing memories.

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